Big Brother in the Workplace: Implanted Access Chips in Sweden 0

{By Alan M. Milner,
Tellus News Digest}
Epicenter, a Swedish incubation center for start-up companies, is injecting microchips into volunteer employees that enable them to pass through security barriers, log onto to protected computers, and purchase items in the canteen just by waving their hands across a reader.

This, in my opinion, is an example of evil incarnate, and a harbinger of the plugged in world that oligarchs would love to see us all embrace. In fact, this is a staple of science fiction becoming a real life event. Stop for a minute and reconsider who this helps and how…and who it hurts, and how.

First of all, these microchips do absolutely nothing that a microchip embedded in a bracelet or a ring could not do just as easily….with a few major exceptions:

The microchip cannot be easily removed by the worker

The microchip cannot be passed along from one employee to another, nor can it be stolen.

And, of course, the microchip gives employers the ability to track employees, determine their locations (onsite at least) and calculate the amount of time the workers actually spend working (or at least at their assigned desks or work stations.)

Of course, the technocratic clique will see this as no big deal, the coming thing, we will all have them sooner or later.

No, we won’t. This is a major invasion of privacy and another level of employee castration….because you can’t remove the microchip yourself.

So, the benefit to the employer is that it provides absolute site security. The drawback to the employee is the loss of autonomy.

No big deal, right?

Well, actually, it is a big deal if you have any interest in freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, or the other rights guaranteed by the Bill of Rights.

The Bill of Rights, as they are written into the Constitution, only controls the behavior of the government, as in, “Congress shall make no law…..” The Bill of Rights, however, does not control the behavior of corporations with respect to the manner in which employers treat their employees.

The process of implanting microchips in people isn’t new. Corporations have been implanting tracking chips into high value targets in an attempt to protect their human assets from kidnapping attempts. Certain government employees are also implanted, according to whispers heard around Washington. It has, in fact, become a status symbol to be so implanted.

However, when companies begin to implant rank and file employees to protect themselves against nefarious activities, the situation has changed quite radically from a protection scenario to an oppression scenario.

The key question is why would anyone implant a microchip rather than simply putting the chip into a bracelet. In addition to the difficulty involved in removing the chip if it is implanted, there is also the perceived threat. An employee can remove a bracelet, but the same employee cannot remove a microchip unassisted, which conveys a not too subtle message to the employee, which might read something like”

“Hey, baby, we own a piece of you. Our technology is implanted in your body and if you try to leave this job without surrendering our property, you could be charged with theft.”

Yes, that’s right. The microchips being installed in these employees belong to the company, not to the employee, which means that their own bodies are no longer 100 percent their own.

Read the Original Article Here